Book Review: Soul in Darkness by Wendy Higgins

Soul in Darkness by Wendy Higgins

Published: February 12, 2019

Rating: 3/5

Goodreads

People travel from afar to the small isle in the Aegean Sea hoping for a single glimpse of Princess Psyche. Their adoration for the mortal woman is so all-consuming that citizens begin to shower her with the very gifts and offerings they once left at the alter of Venus, goddess of love and beauty.

But gods are known for their jealousy.

Cupid, the god of love, takes pleasure in causing strife and mischief in the lives of humans. He uses love as a weapon, humoring in the weakness of people at the whims of their feelings. When his mother Venus approaches him about punishing the human girl who dares to steal her offerings and affections from the people, Cupid gladly accepts.

Even though I consider myself a fan of Greek mythology, I was previously unaware of Cupid and Psyche’s myth or its relationship to the story East of the Sun and West of the Moon.

The author stated the book was initially meant as a YA crossover before she chose to make it an adult romance, and it was apparent throughout the novel. This was part of the reason that I ended up finding the explicit sex scenes throughout a bit jarring at times.

Pieces of it read very much YA, with Psyche acting like a typical 17/18 year old young adult novel protagonist which caused a bit of a clash with Cupid’s character. Cupid is often portrayed as overtly sexual, sometimes coercing affection out of Psyche at the beginning of their relationship. This makes the beginning of their “love” story seem a bit one sided, although they do reconcile and seem a good fit by the end.

The beginning half of the book is focused on the building relationship between Cupid and Psyche. This drags on for just a bit too long, causing a bit of a slump around the middle. I considered putting it down around this point, but am ultimately glad I continued because the pace picks up in the latter half of the book.

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Check out the book on Goodreads.

The Jazz Age is in full swing, but Casiopea Tun is too busy cleaning the floors of her wealthy grandfather’s house to listen to any fast tunes. Nevertheless, she dreams of a life far from her dusty small town in southern Mexico. A life she can call her own.

Yet this new life seems as distant as the stars, until the day she finds a curious wooden box in her grandfather’s room. She opens it—and accidentally frees the spirit of the Mayan god of death, who requests her help in recovering his throne from his treacherous brother. Failure will mean Casiopea’s demise, but success could make her dreams come true.

In the company of the strangely alluring god and armed with her wits, Casiopea begins an adventure that will take her on a cross-country odyssey from the jungles of Yucatán to the bright lights of Mexico City—and deep into the darkness of the Mayan underworld.

I’m so glad that Book of the Month introduced me to this great book! I probably would never have picked it up on my own – and I’m so glad that I did!

Gods of Jade and Shadow reads like a myth in the best way – introducing the reader to a timeless story full of mini parables and insights. I loved that this book read like a living myth. I can see how the writing style is not for everyone – like many myths it can seem a little disjointed at times, however this just added to the story for me.

Although this book is marketed as a 1920’s Mexican Cinderella, I feel that the overall story is timeless. Learning about some Mayan mythology was very interesting as they aren’t stories that I have lots of exposure to.

The main character, Cassiopeia went through a lot of growth throughout the story and it was so wonderful seeing her evolve and change. She can be a little dry at times but neither one of the characters got on my nerves which is something I can’t say about a lot of books I’ve been reading lately. Hun Kame of course helped her along her journey, and he was just the type of brooding hunky guy that gets my heart racing.

Overall a very enjoyable book, possibly one of my favorites of the year!

Rating: 5/5

Review: The Burning Shadow

The Burning Shadow by Jennifer L. Armentrout

Series: Origin #2

Published: October 8, 2019

Summary: When Evelyn Dasher crossed paths with Luc, she was thrown headfirst into the world of the Lux—only to discover that she was already far more involved in their world than she ever suspected…

I’m a huge fan of the Lux series, so it should be no surprise that love has transferred to the spin-off.

The Burning Shadow picks up right where The Darkest Star left off, with Evie still processing the attack by an origin and the shake up of her world. The beginning of this one was a little slow for me. It picks up right where The Darkest Star left off, and the first 40% is mainly spent with Evie ruminating in self doubt about her identity. It’s not until this mark that the main “conflict” of this book is revealed, but after it is it’s nearly impossible to put down!

This books is pretty graphic and bloody and I loved every second of it. I feel like Armentrout knew that many of the readers would be original readers of the Lux series and aged up the content to match more of a New Adult audience. There were some pretty shocking deaths and revelations (hello, massive cliff hanger!) and I’m excited to see how the story will change because of them. I read somewhere that this series is projected to go on for about five books and I’m not entirely sure how thats going to happen with the current storyline – unless we get a Lux series 2.0 situation with the end of the world.

Definitely a book and series that I recommend – although some of the reunions and world-building will be better understood if you read the Lux series first! I’ll be anxiously awaiting the next installment!

Rating: 4/5 Dark Stars ****

Review: Kate Daniels Series by Ilona Andrews

I was saving up reading the Kate Daniels series until after the last book released – and once it did I ended up bingeing the entirety of the ten books (and two of the spin offs) in a span of three months. While I can tell you that I thoroughly enjoyed this series, because of the speed in which I read them (and my lack of Goodreads notes, which is where I normally make comments on current reads), I honestly can’t discuss in detail more than the broadest aspects of the story. In light of my going to see the authors in person soon, I felt that I should at least try to write down some of my feelings!

Kate is a strong but likeable character that has many flaws that are not often seen. Despite questioning herself and making mistakes, she rises above adversity surmounting increasingly impossible odds against enemies great and small. Her romance with Curran is one of my favorite points in the books, as is seeing her grow as a person while remaining in a strong relationship. I feel that a lot of heroines in slightly paranormal romances tend to lose a bit of themselves in relationships, but I didn’t feel this was the case with Kate.

One of my favorite aspects of the series was how fleshed out side characters were. I felt almost if not as invested in their stories as I did in the main characters’, which is what made the spin-off novels so wonderful.

A series that I would definitely recommend to any paranormal romance lovers out there. I can’t wait to read the authors’ other works – and see them in person at my local Barnes and Noble! (For anyone wondering at the plural – Ilona Andrews is a wife/husband writing duo).

What are some of your favorite paranormal romances? I’m always looking for recommendations!

Click Here to go to the Goodreads page for Kate Daniels #1

Overall Series Rating: 4/5

Review: Lord of Shadows

Lord of Shadows by Cassandra Clare

Published: May 23, 2017

Series: The Dark Artifices #2

Rating: ★★★★★

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WARNING: SPOILERS FOR BOOK 1 – LADY MIDNIGHT REVIEW

Would you trade your soul mate for your soul?

A Shadowhunter’s life is bound by duty. Constrained by honor. The word of a Shadowhunter is a solemn pledge, and no vow is more sacred than the vow that binds parabatai, warrior partners—sworn to fight together, die together, but never to fall in love.

Emma Carstairs has learned that the love she shares with her parabatai, Julian Blackthorn, isn’t just forbidden—it could destroy them both. She knows she should run from Julian. But how can she when the Blackthorns are threatened by enemies on all sides?

Their only hope is the Black Volume of the Dead, a spell book of terrible power. Everyone wants it. Only the Blackthorns can find it. Spurred on by a dark bargain with the Seelie Queen, Emma; her best friend, Cristina; and Mark and Julian Blackthorn journey into the Courts of Faerie, where glittering revels hide bloody danger and no promise can be trusted. Meanwhile, rising tension between Shadowhunters and Downworlders has produced the Cohort, an extremist group of Shadowhunters dedicated to registering Downworlders and “unsuitable” Nephilim. They’ll do anything in their power to expose Julian’s secrets and take the Los Angeles Institute for their own.

When Downworlders turn against the Clave, a new threat rises in the form of the Lord of Shadows—the Unseelie King, who sends his greatest warriors to slaughter those with Blackthorn blood and seize the Black Volume. As dangers close in, Julian devises a risky scheme that depends on the cooperation of an unpredictable enemy. But success may come with a price he and Emma cannot even imagine, one that will bring with it a reckoning of blood that could have repercussions for everyone and everything they hold dear.


The relationship between Emma and Julian was as angsty as ever – and most of the angst probably could’ve been eliminated with a candid conversation between the two. This kind of tension is one of my favorites when done well, and I do believe that Clare pulls it off in this series. 

Seeing Cristina’s relationships with both Kieran and Mark develop was intriguing and has me questioning what will happen to the three of them over time. Likewise, I’m really looking forward to seeing some more Ty and Kit interactions. It’s safe to say that Ty and Kit are my favorite “non-main” characters. I was constantly hoping to catch glimpses of them throughout. 

I enjoyed getting to explore faerie a bit more than in the previous installment, although again I wish there was more time spent Under the Hill. My obvious personal preference is for anything faerie and I’m sooo curious about how Clare’s measures up to other popular interpretations. 

The end of this book was devastating and I would have been sobbing if it hadn’t been spoiled for me, and that’s all that will be said on that. (I somehow managed to avoid all spoilers until a week before I finished it so I’m just a little bitter.)

This book includes more hints at the end game of the series, and I’m so excited to see how all the different threads wrap up in Queen of Air and Darkness.

Review: Lady Midnight by Cassandra Clare

Lady Midnight by Cassandra Clare

Series: The Dark Artifices #1

Published: March 8, 2016 by Margaret K. McElderry

Rating: ★★★★ 1/2

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In a kingdom by the sea…

In a secret world where half-angel warriors are sworn to fight demons, parabatai is a sacred word.

parabatai is your partner in battle. A parabatai is your best friend. Parabatai can be everything to each other—but they can never fall in love.

Emma Carstairs is a warrior, a Shadowhunter, and the best in her generation. She lives for battle. Shoulder to shoulder with her parabatai, Julian Blackthorn, she patrols the streets of Los Angeles, where vampires party on the Sunset Strip, and faeries—the most powerful of supernatural creatures—teeter on the edge of open war with Shadowhunters. When the bodies of humans and faeries turn up murdered in the same way Emma’s parents were when she was a child, an uneasy alliance is formed. This is Emma’s chance for revenge—and Julian’s chance to get back his brother Mark, who is being held prisoner by the faerie Courts. All Emma, Mark, and Julian have to do is solve the murders within two weeks…and before the murderer targets them.

Their search takes Emma from sea caves full of sorcery to a dark lottery where death is dispensed. And each clue she unravels uncovers more secrets. What has Julian been hiding from her all these years? Why does Shadowhunter Law forbid parabatai to fall in love? Who really killed her parents—and can she bear to know the truth?

The darkly magical world of Shadowhunters has captured the imaginations of millions of readers across the globe. Join the adventure in Lady Midnight, the long-awaited first volume of a new trilogy from Cassandra Clare.

Shadowhunters have been with me since middle school, and while a lot of people say it’s time for the series to end, I’m glad new spin-offs keep coming. I waited so long to read The Dark Artifices series because I know how heavy Clare’s cliffhangers can be. I may have waited a bit too long because now that the final book – A Queen of Air and Darkness – is out, I’m still reading Lord of Shadows

I absolutely love any world with faeries in it, which is part of the reason I was so excited to start Lady Midnight. While faeries did feature in it, we didn’t actually get to go into faerie which I was a little sad about (but I have it on good authority characters make the journey in the second installment). 

I loved seeing the Blackthorn children all grown up after seeing them briefly in City of Heavenly Angels and Tales from the Shadowhunter Academy. Ty is undoubtedly one of my favorite characters from the Shadowhunterverse. The new characters of Kit Herondale and Cristina Rosales are also quite loveable and I’m intrigued to see how their storylines play out in the series. 

Teenage love angst is one of my favorite types of angst. The romance in this book is torturous and I shamelessly love it. Emma is the strong warrior, with Julian as the artistic family man. Their trials and tribulations – some of which would undoubtedly be resolved with communication – provided the real driving force behind the book to me. 

While the true “mystery”-based plot was intriguing the story did seem a bit like one that I’ve read before in the series – ultimately while I docked half a star. There were also a few instances that had me questioning the situations validity (SPOILER: i.e. a faerie horse-turned-motorcycle that can’t/doesn’t defend itself when other faerie steeds seem to be able to).

I’m very excited to dive into Lord of Shadows and I believe this book set up what may become my favorite Shadowhunter series! Have you read any of the Shadowhunter books? What did you think?

The Last Wish by Andrzej Sapkowski

The Last Wish by Andrzej Sapkowski, Danusia Stok (translator)40603587

Series: The Witcher #.5

Published: December 14, 2008 (originally 1993)

Rating★★★★ 1/2 (4.5 Stars)

Geralt of Rivia is a witcher. A cunning sorcerer. A merciless assassin. And a cold-blooded killer. His sole purpose: to destroy the monsters that plague the world. But not everything monstrous-looking is evil and not everything fair is good… and in every fairy tale there is a grain of truth.

A collection of short stories introducing Geralt of Rivia, to be followed by the first novel in the actual series, The Blood of Elves. Note that, while The Last Wish was published after The Sword of Destiny, the stories contained in The Last Wish take place first chronologically, and many of the individual stories were published before The Sword of Destiny.

I started this short story collection at the same time as I started the game Witcher 3: Wild Hunt and I felt that it really added to my video game experience. I’m so glad that I decided to pick up this book series because it adds so many layers over the world. A lot of these short stories are twisted and dark takes on classic fairytales which made them even more enjoyable for me because I LOVE a dark retelling.

The backstory of Geralt was something that was so unique and unlike most if not all fantasy stories I’ve read. Geralt is a dark and gritty assassin who has a grey moral compass that makes him all the more likable. There are so many decisions that he has to make in this first collection that have no all-together good or positive outcomes which is rare in a world where the good guy normally wins.

My one complaint is at some points the writing seemed a bit clunky – I believe this is likely because the book was translated from Polish to English and can’t really bring myself to dock a star because of it. I know that the rest of the series has a different translator, so I’m interested to see if the prose flows a bit better.

Now I just need to buckle down and finish the rest of the series before the Netflix adaptation of the books! I definitely recommend this series to any fantasy fans, whether or not you enjoy video games as well.